Baird Creek Preservation Foundation Summer Interns

internships

The Baird Creek Preservation Foundation (BCPF) seeks two paid seasonal interns (approximately 40 hours per week for 10-11 weeks), starting June 2016, to assist Foundation staff and board members in native plant restoration and invasive species management within the Greenway.

The Baird Creek Greenway encompasses over 500 acres along a scenic, wooded stream valley on the east side of the City of Green Bay, Wisconsin. The portion of the Greenway under public ownership is currently contiguous from the East River to Huron Road, with approximately 100 acres of private holdings. As an irreplaceable community asset, the Greenway provides a natural oasis within the urban fabric that is used for many recreational activities including hiking, jogging, bird watching, cross country skiing, and biking. The City of Green Bay is undergoing rapid development on its eastern boundary, creating both opportunities and challenges for Baird Creek. The Greenway is uniquely situated to provide hands-on environmental education and exploration for a rapidly growing population, as well as a passive recreational resource. However, increased foot and bike traffic, storm water runoff, and pressure from invasive species threaten to degrade the ecologically sensitive habitats and stream. In response, the BCPF has initiated an integrated restoration and invasive species management program.

Please note that this is a paid summer hire/internship. Salary is $10.00 per hour.

Specific Intern Tasks will include:
• Removal of invasive plants
• Assisting in coordinating/organizing volunteers
• Identifying and cataloging invasive plant areas
• Planting native plant species

OUR PREFERENCE IS A CANDIDATE WITH WHO IS COMFORTABLE WORKING INDEPENDENTLY USING ArcGIS.

CANDIDATES MUST HAVE RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION.

POSITION MAY BE OFFERED FOR COLLEGE CREDIT THROUGH UWGB IF REQUESTED AND AGREED UPON BEFORE POSITION STARTS.

How to apply:
Please prepare and submit a resume and cover letter, including GPA. The cover letter should clearly state how this position will be beneficial to your future career plans. Include previous relevant course work and experience. Cover letters and resumes (.doc or .pdf files only) should be clearly marked with “Baird Summer 2016″ in the subject line and emailed to Maureen Meinhardt at execdirector@bairdcreek.org.

For more information contact: Maureen Meinhardt 920-328-3505 or execdirector@bairdcreek.org

Prescribed Burn In Baird Creek

In the next few weeks, the Baird Creek Preservation Foundation (BCPF), in conjunction with Fox Valley Technical College, the City of Green Bay and Brown County, will be conducting a prescribed burn of a small part of the Baird Creek Greenway.

A prescribed burn is a fire set intentionally to remove accumulated ground litter left from previous years of growth. The benefits of the fire are many: it provides the stimulation necessary for some seeds to germinate; it allows other seeds to reach the ground so they can also germinate; it discourages the growth of cool weather invasive plants; and it recycles nutrients to the soil. Natural fires have been a part of the growth cycle in our area since before recorded history. Prescribed burns have been used for many years by city, county, state, and national park services throughout the country as a way to benefit native plant communities. We are looking forward to bringing the benefits of this tool to Baird Creek.

The BCPF has worked extensively with the Green Bay Parks and Recreation Department and the Fire Department to ensure that public safety will be maintained at all times. Because they have the expertise, extensive experience, and specialized equipment necessary to ensure safety, instructors and students from the Wild Lands Fire Program at Fox Valley Tech will conduct the actual burn. Members of the BCPF will be stationed at key trail locations to keep any trail users informed of the burn in progress.

The burn area is at the base of the south side of Triangle Hill, just to the west of the area that was burned in 2013. The paved trail provides one of the fire breaks, and the rest of the fire breaks have been cleared by BCPF and the City of Green Bay – and approved by Fox Valley Tech and the Fire Department. The area is approximately 5 acres.

Because the burn requires very specific weather conditions to ensure safety, an exact date cannot be set in advance. We will be looking for favorable conditions starting early April. Our website will contain the most up-to-date information on burn specifics.

If you have concerns about smoke please call Jon Kellermann, Prescribed Fire Specialist, at 920-225-5901. Contact Maureen Meinhardt, Executive Director BCPF, with any questions 920-328-3505.

Baird Creek Earth Week Cleanup

recycle-29227 smallCelebrate Earth Day by joining us at the annual Baird Creek Cleanup on Saturday, April 23rd, from 8:30 a.m. until noon at the Triangle Hill Pavilion (500 Beverly Road). Registration begins at 8:30 and the cleanup will take place from 9 a.m. to noon. Volunteers can help improve the trail system by assisting with cleanup efforts as well as possibly planting native species throughout the Greenway.


Participants will divide into teams based on their interest and head out to explore, pick up litter and debris or plant native species throughout the Greenway. All are welcome to participate; children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Volunteers should dress for the weather and wear work gloves if desired. Light snacks and drinks will be provided by Starbucks. If your group of ten or more will be helping, please let us know by sending an email to execdirector@bairdcreek.org.

We would like to thank Starbucks for sponsoring this event!

Baird Creek 18th Annual Banquet & Meeting

“Stitching the World Together for Migrating Birds”

Guest Speaker – Dr. Doug Tallamy

The Presentation: Biodiversity is essential to sustaining human societies because it is other living things that run our ecosystems. Birds play a large role in ecosystem function, yet, throughout the U.S., we have fragmented the habitats that support our resident and migrant birds by the way we have landscaped our cities, suburbs, and farmland. We can reconnect viable habitats by expanding existing greenways, building riparian corridors, and by changing the landscaping paradigm that dominates our yards and corporate landscapes. Replacing half the area that is now in barren lawn with plants that are best at supporting the insects that sustain spring and fall migrants as well as resident birds while they are breeding would create over 20 million acres of connectivity and go a long way toward sustaining bird populations in the future.
 

Speaker Our Speaker: Dr. Doug Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 84 research publications and has taught Insect Taxonomy, Behavioral Ecology, Humans and Nature, Insect Ecology, and other courses for 34 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens was published by Timber Press in 2007 and was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers’ Association. The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014. Among his awards are the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation and the Tom Dodd, Jr. Award of Excellence.

When: Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Where: Riverside Ballroom, 1560 Main St, Green Bay
Time: Cash Bar/Reception/Silent Auction 5:00 p.m., Dinner 6:00 p.m., Program 7:00 p.m.
Cost: $20 per attendee; includes dinner & program

Questions contact Holly; hollyb@bairdcreek.org
920-328-3505

Save the Date! Annual Banquet March 30, 2016

“Stitching the World Together for Migrating Birds”

Guest Speaker – Dr. Doug Tallamy

The Presentation: Biodiversity is essential to sustaining human societies because it is other living things that run our ecosystems. Birds play a large role in ecosystem function, yet, throughout the U.S., we have fragmented the habitats that support our resident and migrant birds by the way we have landscaped our cities, suburbs, and farmland. We can reconnect viable habitats by expanding existing greenways, building riparian corridors, and by changing the landscaping paradigm that dominates our yards and corporate landscapes. Replacing half the area that is now in barren lawn with plants that are best at supporting the insects that sustain spring and fall migrants as well as resident birds while they are breeding would create over 20 million acres of connectivity and go a long way toward sustaining bird populations in the future.

 

Our Speaker: Dr. Doug Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 84 research publications and has taught Insect Taxonomy, Behavioral Ecology, Humans and Nature, Insect Ecology, and other courses for 34 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens was published by Timber Press in 2007 and was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers’ Association. The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014. Among his awards are the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation and the Tom Dodd, Jr. Award of Excellence.

 

PLEASE PENCIL US IN YOUR CALENDAR FOR THE EVENING OF WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2016. DINNER, SILENT AUCTION, AND PRESENTATION WILL BE AT THE RIVERSIDE BALLROOM IN GREEN BAY. ADDITIONAL DETAILS TO COME